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The Low Carbon Economy Ltd

13 Dec 2007 04:12:28

US set to remain reliant on oil but increase use of renewables



US set to remain reliant on oil but increase use of renewables
While the US is set to remain dependant on oil, natural gas and coal for its energy supplies until 2030, renewable energy consumption is set to double, a new forecast has claimed.

In its annual long-term forecast, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) cited state requirements for increased use of renewable energy sources in energy production as the driving force behind the predicted increase.

Despite this, the report still concluded that 83 per cent of US primary energy requirements in 2030 will still be met by traditional fuel production, Reuters reported.

"The higher level of renewable energy consumption is partially a result of higher energy prices...but it also reflects a revised presentation of state renewable portfolio standards," the report said.

"US energy consumption will continue to be met predominantly by traditional fossil fuels," it added.

According to the EIA, US carbon emissions are set to increase by 25 per cent between last year and 2030.ADNFCR-1235-ID-18393676-ADNFCR


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