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The Low Carbon Economy Ltd

18 Feb 2011 10:02:06

Low carbon energy 'likely to present savings by 2020'



Low carbon energy 'likely to present savings by 2020'
Low carbon energy will present savings for consumers in 2020 if the price of a barrel of oil averages out at $100 (£62).

Energy and climate change secretary Chris Huhne was speaking at a conference at the Royal Geographical Society when he made the claims surrounding the break-even point, the Guardian reported.

Mr Huhne said if the price sits at around $80 a barrel Brits will pay one percent more on their energy bills in 2020.

However, he added: "At the oil price reached this month - $100 a barrel or more – consumers will pay less through the low carbon energy policies than they would pay for fossil fuel policies."

The US administration was said to believe the price will sit at $108 in 2020.

Mr Huhne outlined a number of changes to encourage low carbon energy generation late last year, which some claimed could lead to price rises for consumers.

Research from uSwitch claimed the measures will require investment from energy companies which could increase energy bills by more than £500 a year.  ADNFCR-1235-ID-800413657-ADNFCR


Discussion Thread  

25 Feb 2011

WE ARE ABOVE $100 A BARREL NOW WITH BRENT CRUDE AND NOT FAR OFF WITH WTI !!?? SEE http://www.oil-price.net/


SimHull wrote:

01 Mar 2011

Oh what a nonsense Mr Huhne. As you will appreciate Oil is a scarce commodity and its demand far outweighs any thoughts of its price going down to US $ 80 a bbl. isn’t it nearer to US $105 at the current time already? Yes this may be a spike in the value but the reality is that the trend is still upwards.

One of the issues the World (and not just the EU or the UK) needs to contend with is the fact that with the PRC (People's republic of China) and the RofI (Republic of India) intending to develop a thriving industry of personal vehicles for transport is that the demand for fuels in their transport will create a surge in demand the likes of which will surpass the existing use. Imagine as they say that if they produce 1 car per 5 persons in the populous that for the PRC alone in 2025 this will be 350+ million cars and in the RofI that will be an equivalent number. Now add to that all the other developing countries, Brazil Indonesia Russia Pakistan and now put that in to perspective. It means that the World will need to develop a new Oil Source equivalent to the whole of the existing Middle East and Africa put together by the same time just to meet this new fuel for transport needs. And with the Saudi Arabian UAE Kuwait and other North African and Iran oil fields being depleted by this time the potential to source these new sources of oil is - Pie in the Sky!

What is needed is a rethink and the moves for transportation fuels derived from renewable sources can and will be there to support that. Forget about Electric cars and Hydrogen Cars for they are around but they cannot provide the 1,200 million vehicles or more extra to those that are around at this time. We are going to use the I-C (Internal combustion) engine for at least 30 and more likely 50 years. We can provide fuels for these as Gas or Liquids but the dominant source will be liquid. Making them from Renewable Sources as currently being developed using food crops is just not on. It is forcing prices of food-stuffs up and adds to food-price inflation. We have the use of non-food sources in waste and these systems as being developed in Yorkshire by Mytum and Selby Recycling with Genesyst Auk holds out an easy solution which it is understood will be built in two locations at South Milford and Goole. From the press it appears that these developments will be scheduled to produce over 250 million litres of Bioethanol from Biomass reclaimed from Waste sources. It is also evident from the same press in the EU that similar plants are being progressed by Genesyst in Malta and Holland and in the wider Mediterranean area. When you read these articles it is so evident that the need is to develop a local production alternative for transport fuels that avoids either the importation of oil or as we are now seeing the importation of Bioethanol from Brazil or the USA or India.

What we need is for this Government and its ministers such as Mr Huhne to really think beyond the barrel here for it isn't CCS that is the issue it is fuels for transport. As it is with the price of oil reaching an expected US $120-00 a bbl by 2015 the fuel prices that the people will be forced to pay across the EU will reach €2-40 a litre (£2-00 a litre) very quickly.....possibly even higher at €3-60/£3-00 per litre if the price of oil reaches US $160-00 a bbl by 2017 (as currently projected!) It is possible to make Bioethanol economically from Biomass obtained within the EU for even the DG TREN (Directorate General Transport and Energy) have said that this is a reality. What is not being supported by the UK Government is this more pressing need to go for this biofuel route at the expense of the CCS folly. There would be more credence to the issue if instead of throwing money at this sector of the industry it would do the same for the transport fuels directly as is being developed in Yorkshire with the Mytum and Selby Genesyst plants. The public is not looking for too much here just a reasoned expenditure of their money and then for real returns. The CCS will never deliver any such benefits to them.




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