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The Low Carbon Economy Ltd

15 Jul 2009 11:07:14

Leading German enterprises sign up to Desertec CSP initiative



Leading German enterprises sign up to Desertec CSP initiative
Leading companies from across Germany have signed a memorandum of understanding in Munich to harness the solar energy shined upon North Africa's deserts.

Some 12 enterprises in total - Deutsche Bank, E.ON, Munich Re, RWE and Siemens among them - have joined together to form the Desertec Industrial Initiative (DII), in a bid to provide 15 percent of Europe's electricity requirements.

It will look into the technical, economic, political and environmental feasibility of a large-scale power generation project to produce renewable energy using CSP (concentrating solar panel) technology.

The concept of the DII, which the Guardian reported in June would become the world's largest industrial solar power project, was developed by global think-tank the Club of Rome.

ABB, Abengoa Solar, Cevital, HSH Nordbank, Man Solar Millennium, M+W Zander and Schott Solar have also signed up to be founding members of the initiative.

It is hoped that the scheme will allow for greater energy security across the EU, the Middle East and north Africa; growth and development opportunities in those regions and a significant reduction in European carbon dioxide emissions.

A DII planning entity is to be established under German law by October 31st 2009, after which point it is envisaged that more companies from a variety of nations will be able to join.

The German companies will work with the Desertec Foundation, which was established by members of the Club of Rome, the scientific TREC Network and Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan.

Dr Gerhard Knies, chairman of the supervisory board of the organisation, said: "The founding of the DII is a milestone in the Desertec Foundation's concept for global energy, water and climate security."

http://www.desertec.org/

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Discussion Thread  

arnoh2fc wrote:

17 Jul 2009

The Desertec Consortium will do nothing else than to cement the existing electricty production and distribution system. This system, for example in Germany, lacks any environmental sense at all. In Germany alone, to support TODAY`s existing system, there are more than 1,600,000 kilometres of High Voltages Lines and around 600,000 substations and transformers imployed and in daily use. And this in a country, which is believed to be environmetal sensitive. Here you can find the information graphics on this topic, just see for yourself:
http://www.fair-pr.com/background/german-high-voltage-network.php

In other words, it does not make much difference, when you feed into this system electricity, which is produced in North Africa in a rather uneconomical way by means of old fashioned thermodynamic processes. To come to a low carbon footprint, countries like Germany should soon change their existing energy producing and distributing systems to decentalized and independent production, conversion and sensitive use of energy.
For even further information, go to:
http://www.fair-pr.com/background/facts.php





Discussion Thread  

 


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