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The Low Carbon Economy Ltd

31 Dec 2009 09:12:04

Climate change increases malaria risk



Climate change increases malaria risk
Global warming is putting an additional four million people at risk of catching malaria.

According to new research funded by the government, rising temperatures on the slopes of Mount Kenya are enabling the infectious disease to make its way into the Central Highlands district.

In this region, the local community is known to have minimal or in some cases no immunity.

Already, seven times more people are developing malaria in certain regions compared to ten years ago.

"The spread of malaria in the Mount Kenya region is a worrying sign of things to come," international development secretary Douglas Alexander said.

"Without strong and urgent action to tackle climate change, malaria could infect areas without any experience of the disease. That's why we need to make sure vulnerable, developing nations such as Kenya have the support they need to tackle the potentially devastating impacts of climate change," he added.

The study was funded by the UK Department for International Development.

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