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The Low Carbon Economy Ltd

08 Nov 2007 05:11:35

Alarming energy picture painted



A new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) has raised fears concerning future global warming and energy security by claiming that the world''s energy needs will increase by more than 50 per cent before 2030.

The IEA World Energy Outlook 2007 suggested that energy demand, imports, coal use and greenhouse gas emission have all increased since last year.

It predicted that fossil fuels will continue to dominate the fuel landscape, accounting for 84 per cent of the expected demand increase in the next two-and-a-half decades.

The report also forecast that energy-related carbon dioxide emissions will continue to rise, while demand for oil will reach 116 million barrels a day by 2030, up 32 million from 2006.

Coal usage, meanwhile, will see an increase of 73 per cent over the 25-year period, with its share of total energy demand jumping from 25 per cent to 28 per cent.

By 2030, the agency also predicted that developing countries, notably India and China, will account for over half of the global energy market.
ADNFCR-1235-ID-18348924-ADNFCR


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