Everything News Jobs Opportunities Events Products/Services
more
 
About
Go to Home
Sign Up Sign in

Earthscan

The Limits to Scarcity


The Limits to Scarcity: contesting the politics of allocation
Edited By Lyla Mehta with foreword by Steve Rayner

About this book
Scarcity is considered a ubiquitous feature of the human condition. It underpins much of modern economics and is widely used as an explanation for social organisation, social conflict and the resource crunch confronting humanity's survival on the planet. It is made out to be an all-pervasive fact of our lives – be it of housing, food, water or oil. But has the conception of scarcity been politicized, naturalized, and universalized in academic and policy debates? Has overhasty recourse to scarcity evoked a standard set of market, institutional and technological solutions which have blocked out political contestations, overlooking access as a legitimate focus for academic debates as well as policies and interventions?

Theoretical and empirical chapters by leading academics and scholar-activists grapple with these issues by questioning scarcity's taken-for-granted nature. They examine scarcity debates across three of the most important resources – food, water and energy – and their implications for theory, institutional arrangements, policy responses and innovation systems.

The book looks at how scarcity has emerged as a totalizing discourse in both the North and South. The 'scare' of scarcity has led to scarcity emerging as a political strategy for powerful groups. Aggregate numbers and physical quantities are trusted, while local knowledges and experiences of scarcity that identify problems more accurately and specifically are ignored. Science and technology are expected to provide 'solutions', but such expectations embody a multitude of unexamined assumptions about the nature of the 'problem', about the technologies and about the institutional arrangements put forward as a 'fix.' Through this examination the authors demonstrate that scarcity is not a natural condition: the problem lies in how we see scarcity and the ways in which it is socially generated.

About the editor
Lyla Mehta is a sociologist and research fellow with the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, UK and an adjunct professor at the Department of International Environment and Development Studies (Noragric), Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

This book costs £19.99. Please send an enquiry for purchase details.


Community Review  

 


Related Categories

Clicking a category below will direct you to a list of related information

Skip Navigation Links.


Linked Items From Earthscan


  1. Repowering Communities Products & Services

    Repowering Communities: small-scale solutions for large-scale energy problemsBy Prashant Vaze and...

  2. Climate Change Denial Products & Services

    Climate Change Denial: heads in the sandBy Haydn Washington and John Cook with a foreword by...

  3. Cities and Climate Change Products & Services

    Cities and Climate Change: global report on human settlements 2011By UN-HABITATAbout this...

  4. Renewable Energy and the Public: from NIMBY to participationEdited by Patrick Devine-WrightAbout...



Related Items From Everyone


  1. According to Christian Kjaer, chief executive officer of EWEA, "Turkey could be among the top...

  2. In a specialist supplement on green technology published in The Times newspaper today,...

    04 Jun 2009
  3. Biomass Products & Services

    Heating systems used for industrial process. Also supply combined heat & power units.

  4. Framed Wall Insulation Products & Services

    Timber Frame Wall Insulation, bring timber framed wall insulation performance to new levels

  5. Vital Energy Organisations

    Vital Energy was established to provide energy efficiency advice to...




Go To Home

Resource Links

We're social: View Available Feeds Find out more! Leave us your feedback

RSS



We appreciate all feedback. Please leave as much or as little as you like about any aspect of this website.

If your message requires a response, please leave your email address.